Trouble at the EU

I enjoy Metro the UK national free morning newspaper. It has a very straightforward non-partisan style. This morning there was an article dealing with the European Union’s (EU’s) accounting difficulties. There were a couple of very telling admissions from an EU bureaucrat. We lawyers love an admission.

Aidas Palubinskas, from the European Court of Auditors, … described the error rate as ‘relatively stable from year to year’.

He admits that the EU’s accounting is a stable system of trouble. That is a system where there is only common cause variation, variation common to the whole of the output, but where the system is still incapable of reliably delivering what the customer wants. Recognising that one is embedded in such a problem is the first step towards operational improvement. W Edwards Deming addressed the implications of the stable system and the strategy for its improvement at length in his seminal book Out of the Crisis (1982). The problems are not intractable but the solution demands leadership and adoption of the correct improvement approach.

Unfortunately, the second half of the quote is less encouraging.

He said the errors highlighted in its report were ‘examples of inefficiency, but not necessarily of waste’.

This makes me fear that the correct approach is far off for the EU. Everything that is not efficient, timely and effective delivery of what the customer wants is waste, as Toyota call it muda. Waste represents the scope of opportunity for improvement, for improving service and simultaneously reducing its cost. The first step in improvement is taken by accepting that waste is not inevitable and that it can be incrementally eliminated through use of appropriate tools under competent leadership.

The next step to improvement is to commit to the discipline of eliminating waste progressively. That requires leadership. That sort of leadership is often found in successful organisations. The EU, however, faces particular difficulties as an international bureaucracy with a multi-partisan political master and a democratically disengaged public. It is not easy to see where leadership will come from. This is a common problem of state bureaucracies.

Palubinskas is right to seek to analyse the problems as a stable system of trouble. However, beyond that, the path to radical improvement lies in rejecting the casual acceptance of waste and in committing to continual improvement of every process for delivery of service.

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